Which countries are suffering from a quarter-life crisis?

Following on from our earlier post on how it is not just Britain that is suffering from a quarter-life crisis due to poor levels of youth employment. We thought we would ask our good friend Google which countries are suffering from a QLC the most. The results are quite surprising.

According to Google Trends there is in fact a number of other countries who are suffering from QLCs. However, what is surprising is that the country who searched for quarter-life crisis the most was not in fact the US or the UK – it was the Philippines. As you can see from the graph below, the Philippines have been using the search term ‘Quarter Life Crisis’ three times more than those in second place, the US. With Makati City being the place in crisis the most, closely followed by Quezon City and Manila.

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Youth unemployment has been rife in the Philippines, specifically over the years of 2009 – 2012 where unemployment among people aged under 30 averaged 74.825 million people over the four years, a rate of 12.65% – that’s a rate of one in eight people under the age of 30 being unemployed.

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However, as our graph shows Google’s data stretches back to 2005 therefore meaning that whilst unemployment hit it’s peak during the years of 2009 – 2012, the Philippines youth unemployment rate has been steadily decreasing over the last two years. A trend that has come about through the rise in part-time work becoming more readily available for the youth population in Philippines

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Quarter-Life in the media: what’s being said about it in the news?

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Spring is (sort of) here and we want to be outside which means it’s even harder to keep up with the news since we wrote last month’s ‘top 3 QLC articles’. There’s just SO MUCH of it everywhere. And lately we’ve been spotting a lot of intriguing media coverage of the quarter life crisis in all its different forms.

But you don’t have to go trawling through all the weekend supplements, blogs and magazines because we’re gathering the best stuff right here at QLClueless. There’ll be new material each month so come and see what we’ve found in the world of QLC.

Top 3 things you should read this month (Spring QLC Special)

1) This account of being 25 and ‘stuck’ by  ‘black feminist writer and PHD candidate’ J.N Salters  is our favourite QLC piece of the week. This  Huffington Post article is a brilliant insight into exactly how a QLC-addled mind works:

 

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What we learnt: That we should probably check out these books that Salters talks about.

Here’s the YouTube video of Christensen doing a TED talk. You’ll have so many attainable goals after this video that you’ll need a….(insert football pun here)

Actually, we’ve read the third one (Damian Barr) and after reading our crazy-good QLClueless interview with the author himself, you probably have too….

 

2) It’s not new (2013 in fact) but we think it’s time to pleasure our ears again with BBC Radio 4’s brilliant analysis of the quarter-life crisis. What makes it worth a listen is the witty and non-nonsence author Katharine Whitehorn talking all things QLC  with people like us. There’s really nothing to not like, especially the bit where they discuss how Vagenda editors Holly Baxter and Rhiannon Cosslett struggled to pay rent … holls

 

What we learnt: That it is possible to be successful and get paid to do what you love, even if it takes longer than it might have taken our parents. QLCs are scary things, but they can lead to extremely good things.

3)This Guardian article about post-uni unemployment and cluelessness isn’t a cheerful read but it’s a searingly honest account of how tricky things can be in the boomerang generation when it comes to finding a job. Not an internship but a real job…where you can actually go to the office party and make a fool of yourself like everyone else.

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What we learnt: That even when certain slightly older people say we’re just moaning, we’re not. It’s actually true that unpaid internships are elitist and that we’ve got less stability than previous generations. It’s not whining, it’s just a fact. But that doesn’t mean there’s no point in being optimistic and doing everything you can do get where you want to. ‘Cos after all, someone has to get the job. It’s worth checking out this ‘open letter to early graduates’ on the These Millennials blog for some wise words on this subject.